Filtering by Tag: Entertainment

Turning Fickle Fans into Friends

Just got off the weekly skype call with one of our artists – Drastic Jo – she has a release scheduled for November 13 and we’re busy developing the direct to fan marketing plan.

Typically one of the most important parts of such a plan is the acquisition stage – this is where you set up the digital platform in order to reap as many email addresses, Twitter followers, Facebook and MySpace friends as possible. Figures show that the more people you have on your “lists’ the more dough you make.

However, over recent months there has been a lot of discussion around the importance of developing a deeper relationship between the artist and their existing fans. Having been out and about this week, it was interesting to hear one established management firm state that “Fans suck – it’s all about Friends” – and he wasn’t talking about the digital ones.

With the exploding number of bands and tracks now being marketed to the same audience – an artist not only has to grow new fans and convert them to friends, she has to look after her existing friends in order not to lose them to a competing artist.

Current Direct to Fan marketing is still based around a traditional release date – it makes sense on many different levels; having a specific event and a date allows both artist and fan to focus on each other at the same time. How then does the artist engage the fan and deepen that relationship outside the period of a specific release?

There’s a longer post brewing here – but here’s the short version.

Up until recently the people behind the music were strange mysterious creatures – beings that had this amazing ability to create stuff that changed our lives and made us feel. We assumed that ‘cos we liked their music we would like them – prior to the last decade the only exposure we had to artists were either on stage or through corporate controlled media channels.

They say that absence makes the heart grow fonder - though we had their music in our heads every day – the artists themselves were distant figures and we loved them. Compare that to nowadays: bands are encouraged to Twitter their every move – it’s hard to distinguish between your favorite artist and your favorite social media douche.

As the dust settles on the new music marketing revolution one thing is clear – artist’s lives are no more interesting than yours – and considerably less interesting than your immediate friends. If absence made the heart grow fonder then familiarity clearly breeds contempt – just ask John Mayer.

The only reason I am interested in an artist is because they create music – or in Jo’s case not just music but killer art as well. Once I’m beyond the initial rush of having complete access to who they are, the only time I want them to push out to me is when they have something new.

We think artists and bands need to think about how they release their music. We think a combination of specific release date combined with a monthly release of individual tracks allows for dedicated acquisition planning as well as looking after and deepening the relationship with existing fans.

Things have changed – no shit – but things are changing faster than the experts can write about it. A fan will move onto the next new thing – the next free download – the next photo opp or scandal. A friend will stay with you, will open your email, will come to a show and bring a friend. If your marketing plan purely deals with getting fans, you might want to hang on to your day job.

Photo Credit: The Explosion in the Alchemist’s Laboratory, Justus Gustav van Bentum - Chemical Heritage Foundation, Flickr

Your Music = Unique / Your Website = Derivative

Ask any band what they sound like and you can guarantee that they’ll tell you they’re unique. Sure they might give you qualifying reference points: Led Zeppelin meets the EaglesKaren Carpenter on top of Diane Birch (Hmmmm!) but at the end of the day – when you listen to the band – there is no other soul on the planet that sounds like them.

So why would you want your band website to look like someone elses? I mean – you don’t dress like other bands do you?

There are loads of options for bands that are looking for a new site – companies are popping up every week with a new variation on the band theme template. However, when you look at the marketing that surrounds these solutions the one message that comes across very clearly is this:

“Spend your time writing and playing music and only spend a few minutes setting up your website – it’s Easy!”

Stop and think about that for a moment. Your website is your home – it is the place that the VAST majority of your fans will interact with you. Your website is international, no matter how many Volcanoes are hitting Europe. Do you really want the thing that differentiates you from the next band to be a different color background?

Here’s our view – your website is critical to your success and if you aren’t spending time learning how to use it and develop it then you may as well play your gigs onstage behind a black curtain. For every second that you spend on working out your stage plot, the set list – what the drummer’s going to wear…you need to double that on how you present on your website. We’re not saying that an awesome looking site is going to make up for lousy music – but a cool engaging site that screams who you are and makes it easy for a fan to interact with you and your music sure is going to help.

Now if you have the money – then you can skip that stage and hire us to come in and build a Kick Ass site for you – but we reckon that most bands starting out don’t have $550 lying around to blow on a website. But we reckon you do have time - learning tech is no different than learning an instrument – it all comes down to how many hours you put into it.

Kilted Chaos is working with DTF Works to build an affordable solution to this and yes – it involves you learning how to make shit work - more very soon.

Image Credit: Day 157 - Pasukaru76 on Flickr

Monsters Are Not Myths Kill Valentine's Day Lameness

Monsters Are Not Myths are at it again – our favorite San Fran Indie band are spreading the love this Valentine’s day with more personalized songs for that special person in your life.  From their website:

Monsters are not Myths, beloved Bay Area band and all-around funny people, will call your loved one or crush and sing them a customized song for FREE! (plus, we'll even send you a mp3 of the call)

We don't sign you up for any mailing lists or try to sell you things...all we'll do is ask that you check out our music.

Check them out performing calls on Mother's Day:

In a world full of lameness how cool is this?

We wrote a while back about Tim Halperin who was running a competition along similar lines but we have to hand it to MANM who’ve been doing this approach for a while, and unlike Tim you can contact MANM right now and still give your main squeeze something unique this year.

They have a simple sign up form that asks a few questions so that they can personalize the song – and if you’re digging the service – why not drop them a small donation – you don’t have to but hell – isn’t this worth more than hallmark card and sad looking stuffed puppy you were thinking of? Here's a little more MANM for you:


Quantcast

Finally – if you dig MANM – you should enter the#FREECHAOS website and hosting competition for them – or for any band that you dig – free site, free hosting and free ecommerce! – Wow – that’s a Valentine’s gift any band would be happy with.

RCRDLBL

It used to be that you only listened to one kind of music – your whole identity was wrapped up in a couple of bands that would shape your clothes, your hair who you hung out with and who you made out with. 

From what I can tell – this is all pretty much in the past.  With terrestrial radio being nothing but Prozac for the masses – people are getting their music from satellite or the internet; when you control who you listen to, the choices are endless.

Over on music2work2 I have been actively listening to beat makers – I'm looking to incorporate more beats into the music and there is no better way to do this than listening to different artists.  The site that I use for this is RCRDLBL.  To quote from their about page:

RCRD LBL is an online record label releasing exclusive and completely free music from emerging and established artists. In addition to our in-house label, the RCRD LBL network includes a curated roster of independent record labels offering free MP3 downloads and multimedia content in blog format.

Which sounds groovy and all – but in reality it means that every day I get an email from them with one, sometimes two tracks which I can listen to and if I like – download.  The music is predominately dance, hip hop, club music with the odd Indie band thrown in for fun – if I dig the track I can add the band to my RCRD LBL and download the Free MP3. They also make it super easy to embed the track on your site - which is something I really like and is why you're currently grooving to Whatevr u Want right now!

As a music delivery service it’s great and I love the write ups about the artist – although they often seem to be pulled from the artist’ bio page.  What I don’t like about the site is how long it takes to log in – it takes for-freakin-ever.  Also the layout of the site is really blocky and chunky – kind of like they did a wireframe and then forgot to actually take it to the next level.

Still – at the end of the day this is about the music and if you’re interested in new beats I can thoroughly recommend RCRDLBL.

*** Last week to enter the #FREECHAOS competition and win a free website and hosting for a year ***

Don't Call Me A Fan

You know – I’m as much of hipster dude as the next guy (especially if the next guy is Alex!) – although I’ve never done Bikram, I could pop a couple of polos and have been known to drink the odd PBR here and there – however – one thing that I struggle with is the idea of being a Fan.

Having grown up in the seventies – when the world was still reeling from the Beatles phenomenon – a fan was typically portrayed as a teenage girl, head thrown back, eyes closed and mouth opened wide enough to allow her adoration out in a blood curdling yelp.  If that’s what a fan was – then I wasn’t ever going to be a fan of anything.

Now don’t get me wrong – I am a huge supporter of music and bands – I’ve put plenty of money into the pockets of people like Bowie, The Stranglers, the Pretenders etc, and I’m stoked to give money in return for tracks from bands like Company of Thieves or The Hold steady – but have I ever joined a Fan Club? – No.

But I do want to be in the club – I do want to be in the cool hipster club – I want to get the music early, I want to know the inside gen on the drummer, I want to hear them working out new tracks and I want to know how to see them.  I want to know when they’re coming to my town and where they’re playing and how much it’ll be, but more than that – I’d love to connect with them – even if it’s just once – I’d like them to know I exist. 

I’ve never wanted to be part of the “VIP” selected guests who buy their way backstage and force a bullshit session on the bands before or after they’ve played – that just reeks of crap to me and I’d much rather it happened organically.  But – I would love it if my favorite artist retweeted something of mine or commented on my blog or wrote something about me or my family.  How cool would that be?  I’d be stoked if my photo of the latest gig made it up to the front page of the band’s website – hell – I might even create something totally cool - totally cool based on the band - something that other people like me – supporters of the band would dig – and if that got on the front page I’d be even more stoked and then and then…

I don’t want to be a fan – I don’t want to be in someone else’s club – I don’t want to be treated like a screaming teenager - I don’t want to be part of some lame online community – I don’t need a card or a signed photo – I want access and connection – and I have the dough to pay for that.

If you know a band that needs a new website - which is a really good place to develop such a connection - enter the FREECHAOS competition here - only 1 more week to go!"

Digital Music News

If you’re thinking of your band as a business – (which we sincerely hope you are by now) then there is another read that you might want to incorporate into your daily routine: Digital Music News.  Written by Scion of the business Paul Resnikoff and his team out of Los Angeles, the Daily Snapshot is delivered to 20,000 subscribers every morning around 5 AM and has everything you need to negotiate that fat 360 deal with the label.

Let's not allow the fans to kill the music

I met Paul at the 2nd Bandwidth conference in San Francisco a few years back; for a journalist who operates in such a turbulent market he was one of the most positive and enthusiastic guys there – you can tell that he eats, sleeps and breathes the music world.  I’ve been reading DMN for 4 years now and if I had to choose one industry publication over all others – this would be it.

Aimed at Industry executives – the snapshot’s content tends to be data driven (which is reassuring!) backed up with thoughtful analysis in digestible bite size paragraphs.  Relevant ads from companies whose services you might actually want to use as well as the latest conference dates and industry jobs makes it a great top level start to the day.

© 2011-2019 Simply Friday All Rights Reserved| Contact|  Design by me